Lily buttonhole bother in Bugle!

Michelle and Jake’s wedding at St Peter’s Church, Treverbyn, Bugle, with Lily on Saturday 20th October 2012

Lily outside St Peter’s Church, Treverbyn, Nr Bugle.

Reveille awakened my senses at sunrise on this fine autumnal morning writes Chauffeur Bob. Bugle was calling Lily, our scrumptious cream and white VW Samba for Michelle and Jake’s appointment of a lifetime.

Regular readers of our blogs would soon discern that no two weddings are ever the same, all uniquely different and of course, deeply special.  As ever though, today’s lovely occasion was not immune from a few of those unrehearsed moments that always add a little ‘spice’ to the proceedings…

Lily looked absolutely resplendent in Cadbury purple ribbons and ivory bows, matching Michelle and Jake’s colours to a tee as I set off in search of Bugle.

Sorties chugging up the A30 in any one of our flirtatious girls are always a pleasure and today’s was no exception – a whole hour of waving, smiling and being snapped by passing motorists with their ubiquitous phone-cameras.

Bugle represented new territory for Lily as I arrived with plenty of time to spare. This gave me the opportunity to get my bearings and wipe off a few specks of the squashed fly variety from Lily’s shiny paintwork – I must learn to steer round them!

The plan was three separate pick-ups from two Bugle addresses and drop off at St Peters Church at nearby, Treverbyn.

Jake and Ian arrive at St Peter’s church.

I had no trouble in finding Jake’s tucked away abode. He was there ready and waiting with his Best Man, Ian.  A few poses later, we were underway for the short trip to the church. I could see some buttonhole fumbling going on in my rear view mirror – a regular occurrence, one would add!

Bothersome buttonholes for the boys routinely surface at the ‘eleventh-hour’.  Hardy unsurprising considering that it’s not every day that us blokes, polygamists excluded, frequent weddings or arrange meetings with unfamiliar faces under the clock at Waterloo.

What’s more, buttonhole etiquette and attachment does not feature, from memory at any rate, in wedding rehearsals .

Upon arrival at the church, Jake’s Ushers appeared to be having buttonhole bother as well. I must admit, the stems did look a trifle on the large size and the securing pins looked particularly large and menacing, as is the fashion!

A pair of scissors and a couple of safety pins from Lily’s Kath Kidston bag of emergency wedding day essentials did the trick and buttonhole sanity was restored.

I thought it was time to include a buttonhole ‘factoid’ at the foot of this blog.

Photographer and family friend, Charlie Hesse, soon set to work capturing some of the first, all important moments of the day.

A quick blast on the klaxon and it was time to depart for the bride’s boudoir to collect Michelle’s Mum; Sandra, along with Bridesmaids, Alison, Rebecca and Katie.

I arrived exactly at 12:30pm as planned. Everyone was ready and eager to get going. A small gathering of neighbours and well wishers were there to give the bridal party a royal send-off. Michelle was already outside as well with her Dad; Mark and Paige Boy; Daniel. Although they were not due to depart until the final trip at 12:50pm, they remained outside to wave off Mum and Bridesmaids. The sun was shining and Lily’s wonderfully rare ragtop was rolled fully back, much to delight of her VIP passengers.

Mum, Sandra with Bridesmaids; Alison, Rebecca and Katie.

Lily’s VIP’s simply love her rare, full length ragtop (sunroof).

Lily’s guests clearly enjoyed her short, penultimate chug to the church, by which time a large crowd were starting to gather, eager to get a glimpse. With her precious cargo photographed and disembarked, I pointed Lily back towards Bugle and no doubt, an anxiously awaiting bride!

The timing couldn’t have gone any better and at 12:50pm on the dot, accompanied by Michelle, her Dad; Mark and Paige Boy; Daniel we slowly made our way to the church. Although a few pesky clouds seemed to be following us, Lily’s roof remained open to the elements, as we waved and chatted our way to Michelle’s appointment of a lifetime.

Michelle with her Dad, Mark and Paige Boy, Daniel.

As we turned the corner and made our final approach, Michelle could see the sizeable audience waiting to greet her; Vicar, photographer, Mum and Bridesmaids included – a heightening of pre-nuptial nerves understandably always arrives at this stage. The realisation of all that hard work and planning has come to a crescendo – it’s here, it’s really happening!

It wasn’t long before the bridal party got the cue and commenced their procession down the leafy path and into the church and the doors closed behind them. It was just after 1pm.

The time has arrived!

About two thirds of the way through the ceremony, totally unbeknown to the wedding party, I had a request from someone standing and shouting from the Community Centre car park opposite…  “As you’re something to do with the wedding, could you go in and ask whoever’s got the maroon Peugeot to move it”. Apparently a guest was blocking someone in. Looking a little dumbfounded, I replied “you can’t honestly be serious, the ceremony is in full flow!”

A few moments later I could see that impatience had gotten the better of him and he’d employed the use of a rope tied to the Peugeot’s tow-bar to ‘yank’ the car a few feet clear. Whatever’s happened to the Cornish sense of ‘dreckly’, I thought!

Literally a few minutes afterwards, a smiling Mr. and Mrs. Moore emerged through the church doors to the customary tune of Mendelson’ s Wedding March with the guests in hot pursuit.

Photographs and confetti ensued as the happy couple made their way to jump aboard Lily for a champers reception.

Charlie the photographer worked hard to get the couple seated in exactly the right spot and their glasses, just so. Unfortunately, the cork was refusing to pop on demand. One of the Ushers asked whether I had a sword – a quick rummage through Lily’s Kath Kidston bag proved unfruitful. Suffice it to say, the cork finally went into orbit and glasses charged. I must remember to add a sword for such eventualities though!

The happy couple make their way to Lily and awaiting champers!

Congratulations Mr. and Mrs. Moore!

Michelle and Jake happy and upstanding in Lily.

Time was marching on and Charlie, the photographer, needed to get the formal, set pictures taken back at the reception venue before everyone sat down for speeches.

So it was with klaxon blasting away, Jake and Michelle upstanding and waving, we made a noisy and colourful departure for Lostwithiel Golf Club some 30 minutes or so away.

Fortunately it remained dry, despite looking threatening at times. A bit of a shame, I thought, that we didn’t have time for a detour and photo shoot somewhere en-route, but I could tell that Jake, Michelle, and everyone else, come to that, had thoroughly enjoyed Lily’s company.

A few handshakes and kisses followed as we said our goodbyes.

On the way back to Strawberry Leisure HQ I was wondering whether a certain Peugeot driver had noticed that his or her car had miraculously moved itself a few feet!

www.golf-hotel.co.uk

Michelle and Jake will shortly be honeymooning in Cuba. Our best wishes go with them – have a wonderful time x

Buttonhole factoid

It’s suggested that Prince Albert was given a small bouquet from Queen Victoria on their wedding day. He then apparently proceeded in gentlemanly fashion to cut a hole in his lapel and put the flowers in it. He is reputed as later having his tailor put holes in all of his jacket lapels and seemingly, history was made!

French for buttonhole is Boutonniere”. In the US, boutonniere is the flower itself that is worn in the lapel.

There appears to be a few contradictions on how a buttonhole should be worn but seemingly the correct way is to place it through the buttonhole and not pin it to your jacket.

This has always made sense to me, as the buttonhole is obviously there for a purpose.

A word of caution is however appropriate…

Avoid offending family and friends if you’re being asked to pin on a boutonniere as this is commonly the case.

Posted on October 23rd, 2012 under Uncategorized. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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